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Ohio Personal Injury Attorney 

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Personal injury cases are legal disputes that arise when one person gets injured because of some action or lack of action by another person. When get hurt and the fault lies, at least in part, with another person, you are entitled to recover money from them to cover your costs and expenses. Most of the time an injury occurs by accident, but intentional acts such as a bar fight are considered personal injury as well. When you get hurt and the other person was not trying to injure you, the lawsuit is usually based on negligence. This is known as a civil lawsuit (as opposed to criminal).


Ohio Personal Injury Attorney

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Personal injury cases are legal disputes that arise when one person gets injured because of some action or lack of action by another person. When get hurt and the fault lies, at least in part, with another person, you are entitled to recover money from them to cover your costs and expenses. Most of the time an injury occurs by accident, but intentional acts such as a bar fight are considered personal injury as well. When you get hurt and the other person was not trying to injure you, the lawsuit is usually based on negligence. This is known as a civil lawsuit (as opposed to criminal).


Ohio Personal Injury Attorney

What is Negligence?

What is negligence? Negligence has many different definitions, but they all mean basically the same thing. It is the principle that all of us have a duty to act reasonably, and with a level of care that a person of ordinary caution would exercise under the same or similar situation. Four basic factors need to established in proving your negligence claim against another person. They are, duty, breach, causation and damages. 

Duty - First, to prove negligence, you have to show that the other person had a duty of care towards you. A duty of care means an obligation to act with a certain degree of reasonable caution.

Breach – After proving that the other party was required to act with reasonable care, you and your lawyer then need to prove that they failed to meet that duty. A common example of this is the duty to drive a car with reasonable care. (alert, no distracted driving or texting while driving, etc.)

Causation – The next prong of negligence is proving that your injury was the result of the action (or lack of action), by the other party. There are several definitions of causation. The one we use for negligence cases is known as proximate cause, or proximate causation. Proximate cause may not be the first event that set in motion a series of events that led to your injury, and it may not be the very last event before the injury occurs. It is an action that produced foreseeable events without intervention and that resulted in your injury.

Damages – The last element of a negligence claim is damages. People breach their duty of care all the time. However, if you don’t actually incur any costs, expenses or injury from their action, then there is nothing to recover in your lawsuit. Common types of damages we see are physical injuries, damaged property, lost wages, and in some cases punitive damages. Unlike damages designed to pay for your injury, e.g. doctor’s bills or hospital bills (compensatory damages), punitive damages are designed to punish the party at fault. These are only typically recoverable for intentional, reckless or egregious actions. 

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Asset Protection & Medicaid Planning

Elder Law

Estate Planning

Personal Injury

Probate, Trusts & Estate Administration

Guardianship & Conservatorship

Power of Attorney & Living will

Last will & Testament

Trucking Accidents

Common Personal Injury Cases

Intersection and rear-end collisions
Highway and freeway accidents
Accidents resulting from a failure to obey traffic signs or signals
Multiple-vehicle accidents or “pileups”
Truck accidents
Victims of drunk drivers
Individuals hurt by distracted drivers, including drivers who were talking on their cell phone or texting while driving
Those injured by drowsy drivers
Victims of aggressive drivers, including drivers who did not obey the speed limit
Injured passengers
Hit-and-run accidents or hit-and-skip accidents
Dangerous roadways as a contributing factor

Victims of careless drivers or distracted drivers
Fatal accidents
Herniated or bulging discs
Broken bones or fractures
Traumatic Brain Injuries
Spinal Cord Injuries
Severe Burns
Paralysis
Amputations


Types of Personal Injury Cases We Handle

● Car accident
● Boat accident
● Motorcycle accident
● Trucking accident
● Slip and Fall
● Dog Bites


● Assault and Battery
● Defamation – Libel and Slander
● Wrongful Death
● Traumatic Brain Injury
● Construction accident

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: I'm not sure whether I have a case or not! What should I do?

Q: How Much is my Personal Injury Case Worth?

Q: How much does it cost to hire a personal injury attorney?

Q: What are the types of personal injury claims?

Q: What types of “damages” can we recover?

Q: What Happens if I’m Partially at Fault for the Accident?

Q: How Do I Maximize My Personal Injury Claim?

Q: How do I pay my medical bills until I get my settlement? 

Q: When is the right time to contact a personal injury lawyer?

Q: What should I do if an attorney or adjuster from the other person’s insurance company calls me?

Q: I'm not the lawsuit type. We all make mistakes. What are my options?

Q: What if I had a pre-existing condition? 

A: It all depends on the specific facts of the case. Many times it is unclear how severe the injury is and what treatment will be needed until weeks or months after the accident happened. The value of your claim includes all reasonable medical expenses now and in the future. You add in things like lost wages, loss of consortium, and employment changes due to work restrictions. Pain and suffering is typically calculated as some multiplier of these damages. Depending on the facts of your case this can vary between 100%-500% of the amount of your economic damages. Keep in mind that a large award at trial will not mean a big payday unless the other party can pay. Low insurance limits or a lack of insurance always needs to be considered.

Q: I'm not sure whether I have a case or not! What should I do?

Q: How Much is my Personal Injury Case Worth?

Q: How much does it cost to hire a personal injury attorney?

Q: What are the types of personal injury claims?

Q: What types of “damages” can we recover?

Q: What Happens if I’m Partially at Fault for the Accident?

Q: How Do I Maximize My Personal Injury Claim?

Q: How do I pay my medical bills until I get my settlement? 

Q: When is the right time to contact a personal injury lawyer?

Q: What should I do if an attorney or adjuster from the other person’s insurance company calls me?

Q: I'm not the lawsuit type. We all make mistakes. What are my options?

Q: What if I had a pre-existing condition? 

Frequently Asked Questions

A: The insurance for the at fault party will not pay bills until liability is established. You may be able to use your own Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage after a motor vehicle accident. Many physicians will treat you under an agreement that they will be paid from your eventual settlement. In some cases, you can use your personal health insurance, but your health insurance company will have a right to be reimbursed from any jury award or settlement you receive.

Q: I'm not sure whether I have a case or not! What should I do?

Q: How Much is my Personal Injury Case Worth?

Q: How much does it cost to hire a personal injury attorney?

Q: What are the types of personal injury claims?

Q: What types of “damages” can we recover?

Q: What Happens if I’m Partially at Fault for the Accident?

Q: How Do I Maximize My Personal Injury Claim?

Q: How do I pay my medical bills until I get my settlement? 

Q: When is the right time to contact a personal injury lawyer?

Q: What should I do if an attorney or adjuster from the other person’s insurance company calls me?

Q: I'm not the lawsuit type. We all make mistakes. What are my options?

Q: What if I had a pre-existing condition? 

Frequently Asked Questions

A: The insurance for the at fault party will not pay bills until liability is established. You may be able to use your own Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage after a motor vehicle accident. Many physicians will treat you under an agreement that they will be paid from your eventual settlement. In some cases, you can use your personal health insurance, but your health insurance company will have a right to be reimbursed from any jury award or settlement you receive.

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- ANDREA

“Attorney Andrew Popp provided me a quick, knowledgeable response regarding my probate questions. Prior to speaking with Mr. Popp, I had consulted with numerous attorneys in two states -- and received a broad range of answers. In my opinion, the answers provided me by Attorney Popp were offered in a spirit of true professionalism, and backed by a true desire to help.”

- JAMES

“I really enjoyed working with Mr. Popp. He is an asset to his profession.”

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